Education – A Matter of Wisdom

future - pastDuring the past month,  there has been a media focus on the drop in Literacy and Numeracy standards in Australian compared to the global community. To arrive at a reason for this phenomenon would be too broad to address in this short article except to say that we either don’t have a rigorous enough curriculum or students are just not being taught within their own learning styles for success in the changing climate of 21st century educational needs.

It does beg the question as to what the education community as a whole needs to do to return our Aussie system to its former glory of being consistently in the top eight on the world stage in all learning areas until very recent times. To arrive at solutions often means looking back and analysing the way we deliver education to our students. Do we truly whet their imaginations to know how to be critically thinking “learners” or are we simply in a state of flux where no one seems to know the way forward in a world where the goal posts are shifting as I write.

Sir Ken Robinson

Sir Ken Robinson image credit: https://blog.simonassociates.net

Recently I was reminded of a clever TED talk from Sir Ken Robinson called Changing Education Paradigms. It was an engaging expose on this topic and makes for essential viewing as this man’s brilliance and insightful. https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms

It was delivered 18 years ago and at the time when I thought he had really nailed the problem. However accurate I feel he was, and still is, we just didn’t heed his advice and continue to miss the mark.  This was reinforced by a more recent video by Prince Ea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqTTojTija8 

Prince Ea rocks in his opinions on a variety of topics but what struck me was that this young man, from a different time and background  saw exactly what Sir Ken Sir 18 years ago. Yet “the system” continues to haggle with the idea of change and how to make it relevant to our children. They are lost between the old formal way of learning and struggling to keep pace with how to implement changes that would seriously challenge the status quo as we know it. Innovations such as open classrooms, a return to project based learning and injections of funding into school based reading programs demonstrate the intention to find solutions, but are we missing the mark?

Prince Ea

Prince Ea

Why am I bringing this to the attention of our readers? Well I tend to agree with both Sir Ken and Prince Ea. I am always trying to work on making education relevant to students and to ensure we have a diverse range of tutors to teach them. I know it is am imperative to give our children opportunities to reach their potential in a world that is ever changing. The sameness of the last century is just not reaching the mark!

Although the luxury of my stance as a tutoring business cannot be emulated in a busy classroom, we can really benefit from the wisdom of Sir Ken and Prince Ea –  that time has stood still in the broader education arena for far too long and it is time to change the way we deliver education as a nation for the sake of our children and the future of our world.

How Learning a Second Language Benefits Students’ Development and Education

Increasingly, Australian schools are taking positive steps towards making language lessons a compulsory part of the syllabus. Many primary and high school students now learn Italian, French or Japanese, among other languages. But languages classes aren’t just a ‘fun alternative’ to get students trying something new. They’re a very real way of benefitting growth and learning skills.

As discussed in many research publications and news reports, learning another language assists students with multitasking, processing information in more complex ways and, of course, in expanding their social and cultural understanding. More information about the benefits of bilingualism to physiology can be found here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationopinion/10126883/Why-learn-a-foreign-language-Benefits-of-bilingualism.html

Since the beginning of the year, Western Australia introduced language classes for all Year 3 students throughout the state.

“Exactly what language is up to individual schools to determine, but the School Curriculum and Standards Authority has developed syllabuses for the six most popular choices — Chinese, Japanese, Indonesian, French, German and Italian.

Second LanguageIf schools decide to go it alone and teach a different language — such as Arabic, Hebrew, Korean, or an Aboriginal language — they will be able to use an alternative curriculum approved by the authority.” (Language classes compulsory for Year 3 students in all WA schools from 2018, November 2017, ABC).

Such classes are also integral to helping students negotiate an increasingly multicultural Australia, and giving them a competitive edge for future careers as employers increasingly value bilingual skills in their new employees.

Do you know someone wanting to learn a second language?

We’ve compiled a checklist to help them decide which language to choose.

Cultural significance

Over 70% of Australians today have family born overseas. You might think about learning a language that strengthens your relationship and knowledge with your cultural background, if you can’t already read and write in your family’s ethnic language. Alternatively, you might want to branch out and experience a new or exotic culture, such as the language spoken in a country you might want to travel to.

Usefulness in School or a Workplace

Professional environments increasingly require additional language skills for productivity. Conduct some research – if you’re a student, you might want to learn a language which you will excel in during HSC exams. If you’re in a workplace, your business might have ties with another country, so learning a certain language will benefit your communication.

Enjoyment

Make sure you enjoy the language you’re learning! Learning a language should not be a rushed or stressful process. Go at your own pace. Useful apps and both print and electronic resources can assist you. Many can be borrowed from your local library, and other free resources are listed here: https://www.thebalance.com/the-7-best-free-language-learning-apps-1357060 and here: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/fodors/7-outstanding-language-le_b_6431448.html. Above all, have fun!

If you’re already bilingual, you may consider learning yet another language! This can be a fun hobby that is genuinely beneficial to your quality of life. Of course, language tutors are also great resources, who can guide you through the process supportively, sharing ­

Pleasures of Reading: Benefits

Children’s inherent appetite for books should be encouraged through activities that build a passion for reading. This can be achieved through active participation in literature that whet’s their imagination and interests. Whilst technology, for a time, reigned in favour against the tactile “book in the hand” there is a current resurgence for the presence of a book with pages to turn. We can perhaps envisage and hope for a complete return to the earlier pursuit of children being curled up in their favourite place whilst reading for pleasure.

Reading for pleasure

Image credit: Pixabay

Taking children beyond the classroom, to read for pleasure at home, will provide them with tools that ensure their writing and comprehension skills soar. This naturally occurs as they are confronted with a wider use of vocabulary whilst reading and they concurrently learn to read in a way that teaches them the basic conventions of writing and the structure of language. As a result their ability to be “literacy smart” becomes evident. Their writing appears more complex, they are able to write with more detail, they use descriptive tools to enhance their texts with more fluidity and are less prone to the age old problem of “writers block”.

Children who make reading a habitual part of their journey in life employ higher order thinking skills. Their tendency to become critical thinkers, learners who comprehend at an inferential level and students who can make connections from their readings with other contexts are more inclined to find purpose in reading for pleasure. They become engaged readers and learners who look for deeper meanings in what they read and are more often creative writers and problem solvers. As an outcome, they emerge more confident in their ability to tackle complex tasks that require these skills across all areas of their school work and personal learning journeys.

Reading for pleasure is  feeding their imaginations

In addition, reading for pleasure is really all about feeding their imaginations. Books take children on a journey of discovery that is often far beyond their own realisation at the time. The connection with place, people and context enriches their cognitive development by enticing a multi sensory experience as they engage their imaginations by forming images in their minds and turn words into conversations they can hear as they lose themselves in the text.

At the basic level, we all remember the aroma of a new book, the feeling of turning the page, the way words speak to us and that feeling at the end of the book that begs us for more as we look for the next book to read from the shelf.

Books are one of the key cornerstones to a child’s language development and more. Their ability to create language through their own writing and the way in which reading for leisure offers lifelong skills beyond the act of reading should not be overlooked.

Balanced Life During Christmas Holidays

The Christmas Break…A Time to Study? Ho ho…No!

It’s looking a lot like Christmas… and the holidays are upon us!

When you hear of the festive holidays, you’re either one of two people. You’re thinking, “No, please get me out of here! I have work to do!” OR, you’re jingling out to your favourite Christmas carols!
If you fall into the second category – deck the halls!

If, however, you or someone you know is stressing about the work they should be getting done, then read on!

Getting a balanced life, study/life (and sometimes, a work/study/life, particularly for our older students) can be difficult. There aren’t many resources out there for primary and high school kids on how to manage time, get work done AND grow as a person during the holidays. We have some tips for you.

1) Put yourself first!
There will always be work, assignments, practice essays, homework, Christmas shifts…you name it! But to engage in all of that, you need sleep and fun to keep you motivated and energised. Don’t underestimate the significance of taking some time off to chill and just be yourself. Watching movies, spending time out with friends and catching up with family might seem like guilty pleasures during the busy year, but these Christmas holidays are a time when you can do all of these things and get some sleep, and reward yourself for a year of hard work!

2) Break things down
A snowman doesn’t come in one piece – he’s built up in three smaller steps, and then you need to find buttons for his eyes, a carrot for his nose, and maybe even a Christmas hat!
That’s a lot like what your Christmas study should look like. It’s fine to keep your brain active, and do a little revision (especially for our HSC students)! Plan out your study and your work. These holidays, you should be making LOTS of time for fun and sleep, so factor these into your calendar. How about a couple of hours of work or study a week? Sound fair?

3) Work smarter, not harder
There’s lots of ways to keep learning while you take time out to focus on yourself and those you love. Summer sports, reading and travelling are all rewarding ways to meet new people, have new cultural experiences and learn a whole heap of things to get you ready for the adventures that await in 2018! Don’t feel guilty to spend some resources and time on something that is important to you – whether it’s refreshing your library or catching that plane to a snowy Christmas! From painting to learning a new instrument or language, almost any hobby can really be thought of as ‘study’, as long as you’re learning new skills!

So, what’s the overall answer to positive study/life balance? The key word is balance! Your academics and your work are definitely important. But life encompasses so much more than that, and if you’re not going to explore and spend time with the important people and experiences in your life during the holidays, when will you? The Christmas holidays are a time when you can procrastinate without guilt…so turn on those OUT OF OFFICE automated email replies, close your textbooks, and do something adventurous at least once a day!

Check out the links below to help with your Christmas crafts and your Christmas shopping!
If there’s ever a question you have about study/life balance, we’re here to help – even when Santa’s elves have gone to sleep!

Wishing you and your families a very Merry Christmas and happy holidays from Nepean Tutoring!

Family Christmas crafts: http://mumsgrapevine.com.au/2011/12/25-fabulous-christmas-crafts/
Shopping at Christmas: https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/tools-and-resources/news/12-money-tips-for-christmas

Finding the Right Tutor For Your Child

Tutor-Student Matching: How does it work?

It is a well-known fact that as social beings, humans, especially children, learn from those they interact with closely on a daily basis. Children spend an average of 30 hours a week in school, and with other commitments like work, sporting activities and social activities, it is reported that many families now spend less than 40 minutes a day together! (The Digital Hub, 2016)

Finding the Right TutorWith the busyness of contemporary lifestyles, it is more important than ever that the role models in students’ lives are positive ones, demonstrating outstanding values, great study ethics, and everything that lies between.

Tutors, in the very privileged role of being educators who spend time one-on-one with their students, need to be the right match. This is the reason tutor-student matching is taken so seriously at Nepean Tutoring.

From the moment you pick up the phone, you may be wondering what the process is behind the scenes as your student’s tutor is arranged. While all of our tutors here at Nepean Tutoring are skilled and experienced, we consider the little things that make every lesson a success:

Location – where is your student based? Are there local tutors who provide the service your student needs? (Yes! We have tutors throughout Nepean and surrounding regions).

Age and experience – what year level is your student in, and what experiences would they most benefit from in a tutor?

Special considerations – does your student hate a certain subject? Or do they struggle with particular areas of school work, like reading? Can we find a tutor who is passionate and really experienced in those areas to motivate your student? (Yes, we can!)

Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it is stupid. – Albert Einstein

When a tutor and student – or mentor and mentee – sit together to work on anything, be it English or Geography, an exchange of knowledge, values and study ethic goes on. To have maximum potential, and make for a more engaging and memorable learning experience, there needs to be some degree of chemistry. We’ve all had those teachers who just aren’t interesting. Or that head teacher with years of experience who natters on at a level, speed and tone that their young students just do not relate to…

“Students shouldn’t be sharing these things,” the teacher said.
“What things?” A student asked.
“The things that if you have them, you want to share them. But if you share them, you don’t have them.”
The student looks confused. “What’s that?” She asks her teacher.
“It’s a secret!” The teacher replies.

Learning essays or Pythagoras’ theorem doesn’t have to be a riddle. It is the role of a personalised tutor to turn abstract theories into accessible content grounded in students’ real-world experiences. Otherwise, students are alienated by unnecessarily complex explanations. As Albert Eistein once said, ‘Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it is stupid.’ Having a tutor who relates to a student’s experiences and individual personality makes all the difference.

Friends are the family you choose, and so are tutors!